Male Irish Baby Names

ABBÁN:

Irish name meaning “little abbot.”

ABRACHAM:

Irish form of Hebrew Abraham, meaning “father of a multitude.”

ÁDHAMH:

Irish form of Hebrew Adam, meaning “earth” or “red.”

AENGUS:

Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Aonghas, meaning “excellent valor.”

AHERN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hEachthighearna “descendant of Eachthighearna,” hence “lord of horses.”

AILBHE:

Irish Gaelic unisex name, possibly derived from the word albho, meaning “white.” In Irish legend, this is the name of a female warrior of the Fianna.

AILELL:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Ailill, meaning “elf.”

AILFRID:

Irish Gaelic form of English Alfred, meaning “elf counsel.”

AILFRIED:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Ailfrid, meaning “elf counsel.”

AILFRYD:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Ailfrid, meaning “elf counsel.”

AILILL:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “elf.” In mythology, this is the name of the husband of queen Méabh.

AILÍN:

Irish Gaelic name, probably derived from the word ailín, a diminutive of ail “rock,” hence “little rock.”

AINDRÉAS:

Irish Gaelic form of Greek Andreas, meaning “man; warrior.”

AINDRIAS:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Aindréas, meaning “man; warrior.”

AINDRIÚ:

Irish Gaelic form of English Andrew, meaning “man; warrior.”

ÁINLE:

Old Irish name meaning “champion.”

ALAOIS:

Irish form of French Provençal Aloys, meaning “famous warrior.”

ALASDAIR:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Alexandrus, meaning “defender of mankind.”

ALASTAR:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Alexandrus, meaning “defender of mankind.”

ALEC:

Short form of Irish Gaelic Alesdair, meaning “defender of mankind.” Compare with other forms of Alec.

ALESDAIR:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Alasdair, meaning “defender of mankind.”

ALSANDAIR:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Alexandrus, meaning “defender of mankind.”

ALSANDARE:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Alsandair, meaning “defender of mankind.”

AMHLAIDE:

Irish form of Icelandic Amloði, possibly meaning “heavy” or “the dullard,” or Old French Hamelet, meaning “tiny little village.” But this Irish form of the name may have a different meaning, perhaps the same as Amhlaibh.

AMHLAOIBH:

Irish Gaelic form of Scandinavian Anlaf (O.N. Ánleifr), meaning “heir of the ancestors.”

ANÉISLIS:

Irish Gaelic name derived from a byname meaning “careful, thoughtful.” Stanislas and Standish are Anglicized forms.

ANRAÍ:

Irish Gaelic form of English Henry, meaning “home-ruler.”

ANRAOI:

Irish Gaelic form of English Henry, meaning “home-ruler.”

ANTAIN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Antaine, possibly meaning “invaluable.”

ANTAINE:

Irish Gaelic form of English Anthony, possibly meaning “invaluable.”

ANTRIM:

Irish name derived from the name of a county in Northern Ireland, in Gaelic Aontraim, composed of the elements aon “excellent” or “one” and treabh “house,” hence “one house” or “house of excellence.”

AODH (pronounced ee):

Modern Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of Old Gaelic Áed, meaning “fire.” In Celtic mythology, this is the name of a sun god.

AODHAGÁN:

Irish double diminutive form of Irish/Scottish Gaelic Aodh, meaning “tiny little fire.”

AODHÁN:

Irish diminutive form of Gaelic Aodh, meaning “little fire.”

AODHFIN:

Irish name meaning “white fire.”

AODHFIONN:

Variant of Irish Aodhfin, meaning “white fire.”

ÁRDGHAL:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements ard “high” and gal “valor,” hence “high valor.”

ART:

Irish Gaelic name derived from the vocabulary word art, meaning “bear” and “champion.” In Irish legend, this is the name of a son of Conn of the Hundred Battles. Compare with another form of Art.

BAIRRE:

Old form of Irish Gaelic Barra, meaning “fair-headed.”

BAIRTLIMÉAD:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Bartholomaeus, meaning “son of Talmai.”

BALLINAMORE:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Béal an Átha Móir, meaning “mouth of the big ford.”

BALLINDERRY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Baile an Doire, meaning “town of the oak wood.”

BARTLE:

Pet form of Irish Gaelic Bairtliméad, meaning “son of Talmai.”

BEARACH:

Irish name derived from the Gaelic word biorach, meaning “sharp.”
BERACH: Variant spelling of Irish Bearach, meaning “sharp.”

BILE:

Irish name derived from the word bile, meaning “sacred tree.” In mythology, this is the name of a god of healing and light.

BRADÁN:

Old Irish Gaelic name meaning “salmon.”

BRADY:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, derived from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Brádaigh “descendant of Brádach,” hence “large-chested.”

BRAN:

Irish name meaning “raven.” In mythology (from Voyage of Bran), this is the name of a mariner who went on a quest to the Other World. Compare with other forms of Bran.

BRÉANAINN:

Old Irish Gaelic name, meaning “prince.”

BREÁNDAN:

Modern form of Old Irish Gaelic Bréanainn, meaning “prince.”

BRENNAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Braonáin, “descendant of Braonán,” hence “little drop.”

BRIAN:

Irish name derived from Celtic Brigonos, meaning “high hill.” Compare with another form of Brian.

BRIARTACH:

Said to be a corrupted form of Irish Gaelic Muircheartach, meaning “skilled seaman.”

BRION:

Variant spelling of Irish Brian, meaning “high hill.”

BRODY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, meaning “ditch.”

BROGAN:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from Gaelic Ó Brógáin, meaning “descendant of Brógán,” hence “little shoe.”

BRUADAIR:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “dream.”

BRUADAR:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Bruadair, meaning “dream.”

BRUATAR:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Bruadar, meaning “dream.”

BURNEY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Biorna “son of Biorna,” hence “bear.”

BYRNE:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Broin “descendant of Bran,” hence “raven.”

CADÁN:

Variant spelling of Irish Cathán, meaning “little battle.”

CADELL:

Old Irish and Welsh name composed of cad “battle” and the diminutive suffix -ell, hence “little battle.”

CADEN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from McCadden, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Cadáin “son of Cadán,” hence “little battle.”

CÁEL:

Irish Gaelic name derived from the word caol, meaning “slender.” In mythology, this is the name of a warrior of the Fianna.

CÁELÁN:

Diminutive form of Irish Gaelic Cáel (“slender”), hence “little slender one.”

CAÉMGEN:

Modern form of Old Irish Coemgen, meaning “little comely one.”

CAHAL:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Cathal, meaning “battle ruler.”

CAHIR:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Cathaoir, meaning “warrior.”

CAILTE:

Irish name meaning “the thin man.” This is the name of a character from the Fenian cycle.

CAIRBRE:

Irish Gaelic legend name of an Ulster warrior, meaning “charioteer.”

CALBHACH:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “bald.”

CALLAHAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, derived from the personal name Ceallachán, possibly meaning “little bright-headed one.”

CALVAGH:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Calbhach, meaning “bald.”

CAOIMHEÁN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Caoimhín, meaning “little comely one.” This form just uses a different diminutive suffix.

CAOIMHÍN:

Variant form of Irish Gaelic Caémgen, meaning “little comely one.” Kevin is an Anglicized form.

CAOMHGHIN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Caémgen, meaning “little comely one.”

CARBREY:

Anglicized form of Gaelic Cairbre, meaning “charioteer.” In Irish and Scottish use.

CARLIN:

Irish Gaelic unisex name meaning “little champion.”

CARY:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ciardha “descendant of Ciardha,” hence “dark one.”

CATHAIR:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Cathaoir, meaning “warrior.”

CATHAL:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements cath “battle” and val “rule,” hence “battle ruler.”

CATHALDUS:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Cathal, meaning “battle ruler.”

CATHÁN:

Irish name composed of the Gaelic element cath “battle” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little battle.”

CATHAOIR:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the Celtic elements cath “battle, fight” and vir “man,” hence “fighting man, warrior.”

CATHELD:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Cathal, meaning “mighty in battle.”

CAVAN:

Irish name derived from a place named from cabhán, meaning “hollow.”

CEALLACH:

Irish Gaelic name possibly composed of the elements cen “head” and lach “light,” hence “bright-headed.”

CEALLACHÁN:

Diminutive form of Irish Gaelic Ceallach (“bright-headed”), hence “little bright-headed one.”

CEALLAGH:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Ceallach, meaning “bright-headed.”

CEARBHALL:

Irish Gaelic name, probably originally a byname for a violent warrior, derived from the word cearbh, “hacking,” hence “hacker.”

CEARBHALLAN:

Diminutive form of Irish Gaelic Cearbhall, meaning “little hacker.”

CEILEACHAIN:

Irish Gaelic name derived from the word céileachán, a diminutive of céile (“companion”), hence “little companion.”

CHRISTY:

Pet form of Irish Gaelic Críostóir, meaning “Christ-bearer.” Compare with feminine Christy.

CIAN:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “ancient, distant.” In mythology, this is the name of the son-in-law of Brian Boru.

CIANÁN:

Diminutive form of Irish Gaelic Cian, meaning “little ancient one.”

CIARÁN:

Irish name composed of Gaelic ciar “black” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little black one.”

CILLIAN:

Irish byname composed of Gaelic ceallach “strife, war,” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little warrior.”

CILLÍN:

Variant spelling of Irish Cillian, meaning “little warrior.”

CINNÉIDIGH:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements ceann “head” and �idigh “ugly,” hence “ugly head.” Kennedy is an Anglicized form.

CIONAODH:

Irish form of Scottish Gaelic Cináed, meaning “born of fire.”

CLANCY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Fhlannchaidh, “son of Flannchadh,” hence “red warrior.”

CNÁMHÍN:

Irish Gaelic byname for a skinny man, meaning “little bone.”

CODY:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from a variant spelling of the surname Cuddihy (also spelled Cuddy), an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cuidighthigh “descendant of Cuidightheach,” hence “helper.”

COEMGEN:

Old Irish name composed of Gaelic caomh “comely” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little comely one.”

COILEÁN:

Irish form of Scottish Gaelic Cailean, meaning “whelp; young pup.”

COLM:

Old Irish form of Latin Columba, meaning “dove.” Compare with another form of Colm.

COLMÁN:

Irish form of Latin Columbanus, meaning “dove.”

COLUM:

Irish form of Latin Columba, meaning “dove.”

COMGAL:

Contracted form of Irish Gaelic Comhghall, meaning “joint pledge.”

COMGAN:

Contracted form of Irish Gaelic Comhghán, meaning “born together.”

COMHGHALL:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements comh “joint, together” and gall “pledge,” hence “joint pledge.”

COMHGHÁN:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements comh “joint, together” and gan-/gen- “born,” hence “born together.”

COMYN:

Irish name meaning “shrewd.”

CONALL:

Traditional Irish name composed of the Gaelic elements cú (genitive con) “hound” and gal “valor,” hence “hound of valor.” This is the name of the legendary Ulster hero who avenged Cúchulainn’s death.

CONALLAN:

Diminutive form of Irish Gaelic Conall, meaning “little hound of valor.”

CÓNÁN:

Irish Gaelic name which was originally a byname derived from a diminutive form of cú “hound,” hence “little hound.”

CONCHOBAR:

Irish legend name of a king of Ulster said to have lived at the time of Christ, meaning “hound-lover.”

CONCHOBHAR:

Variant spelling of Irish Conchobar, meaning “hound-lover.”

CONCHOBOR:

Variant spelling of Irish Conchobar, meaning “hound-lover.”

CONCHOBUR:

Variant spelling of Irish Conchobar, meaning “hound-lover.”

CONCHUBHAR:

Variant spelling of Irish Conchobar, meaning “hound-lover.”

CONCHÚIR:

Variant form of Irish Conchobar, meaning “hound-lover.”

CONCHÚR:

Variant form of Irish Conchobar, meaning “hound-lover.”

CONLÁED:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Conlaodh, meaning “purifying fire.”

CONLAOCH:

Irish name, composed of the Gaelic elements con “hound” and laoch “warrior,” hence “hound warrior.” In Irish legend, this is the name of a son of Cúchulainn. He was accidentally killed by his father.

CONLAODH:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements connla “pure, chaste” and aodh “fire,” hence “purifying fire.”

CONLETH:

Modern form of Irish Gaelic Conláed, meaning “purifying fire.”

CONN:

Old Irish name derived from Gaelic conn, having several possible meanings including “chief, freeman, head, hound, intelligence, strength.”

CONNLA:

Variant spelling of Irish Conlaoch, meaning “hound warrior.”

CONWAY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Conbhuide “descendant of Cú Bhuidhe,” hence “yellow hound.”

CORMAC:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements corb “defilement” and mac “son,” hence “son of defilement.”

CREVAN:

Irish name meaning “fox.”

CRÍOSTÓIR:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Christophorus, meaning “Christ-bearer.”

CROGHER:

Irish name meaning “loves hounds.”

CUÁN:

Irish name composed of Gaelic cú “hound/wolf, chief” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little hound.”

CÚ BHUIDHE:

Irish name composed of the Gaelic elements cú “hound/wolf” and buidhe “yellow,” hence “yellow hound.”

CÚ CHULAINN:

Variant spelling of Irish Cúchulainn, meaning “hound of Culann.”

CÚCHULAINN:

Irish myth name of a heroic warrior who accidentally killed his son Conlaoch, meaning “hound of Culann.”

CULLEN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coileáin, “descendant of Coileán,” hence “whelp, young pup.”

CUMHEA:

Irish name meaning “hound of the plains.”

DACEY:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Déiseach (originally a name for a member of the Déise), “a tenant, a vassal,” a word tracing back to Indo-European *dem-s, meaning “house.”

DAGDA:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “the good god.” In Celtic mythology, this is the name of a god of knowledge and magic, and a leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann, supernatural beings who inhabited Ireland prior to the coming of the Celts.

DÁIBHÍ:

Irish Gaelic form of Hebrew David, meaning “beloved.”

DÁIBHÁDH:

Irish Gaelic form of Hebrew David, meaning “beloved.”

DÁIRE:

Irish name derived from the Gaelic element dáire, meaning “fertile, fruitful.”

DAITHÍ:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “swift.”

DALEY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Dálaigh, “descendant of Dálach,” hence “assembly, gathering.”

DARA:

From Irish Gaelic Mac Dara, meaning “son of oak.” Compare with other forms of Dara.

DARACH:

Variant form of Irish Dara, meaning “oak.”

DEAGLÁN:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements deagh “good” and lán “full,” hence “fully good.”

DEAS-MHUMHAN:

Irish Gaelic byname meaning “man from south Munster.”

DEASÚN:

Contracted form of Irish Gaelic Deas-Mhumhan, meaning “man from south Munster.”

DELANEY:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Dubhshláine “descendant of Dubhshláine,” hence “black challenger.”

DEVIN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, derived from the surname Devine, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Daimhín, “descendant of Daimhín,” hence “little fawn.”

DIARMAID:

Irish name probably composed of the Gaelic elements dí “without” and airmait “envy,” hence “without envy.” In mythology, this is the name of a High King of Ireland.

DOMNALL:

Irish Gaelic form of Scottish Gaelic Domhnall, meaning “world ruler.”

DÓNAL:

Earlier form of Irish Gaelic Domnall, meaning “world ruler.”

DONN:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “brown.” In mythology, this is the name of a king of the underworld.

DONNE:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Donn, meaning “brown.”

DONNACHAIDH:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Donnchadh, meaning “brown warrior.”

DONNCHADH:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements donn “brown” and cath “battle, war,” hence “brown warrior.”

DONOVAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Donndubháin, “descendant of Donndubhán,” hence “little dark brown one.”

DORAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Deoradháin, “descendant of Deoradhán,” hence “exile, wanderer.” Compare with another form of Doran.

DRISCOLL:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó h-Eidirsceóil “son of the messenger,” from eidirsceól, composed of the elements eidir “between” and scéal “story, news,” hence “go-between, intermediary, messenger, news bearer.”

DUBHÁN:

Irish Gaelic name, originally a byname, composed of dubh “black” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little black one.”

DUBHALTACH:

Irish Gaelic name, probably composed of the elements dubh “black” and fholtach “-haired,” hence “black-haired.”

DUBHDARA:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements dubh “black, dark” and dara “oak,” hence “black oak.”

DUBHGHALL:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements dubh “black, dark” and gall “stranger,” hence “black stranger.” This is said to have been a byname applied to the Danes, in contrast to the fair Norse settlers of Norway and Iceland.

DUBHSHLÁINE:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements dubh “dark, black” and slán “challenge, defiance,” hence “black challenger.”

EADBHÁRD:

Irish Gaelic form of French Édouard, meaning “guardian of prosperity.”

ÉAMON:

Irish Gaelic form of English Edmund, meaning “protector of prosperity.”

ÉAMONN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Éamon, meaning “protector of prosperity.”

ÉANNA:

Irish Gaelic name derived from the word éan, meaning “bird-like.”

ÉIBHEAR:

Irish Gaelic form of Old Norse Ívarr, meaning “bow warrior.” In Irish legend, this is the name of two sons of Mil (Éibhear Dunn and Éibhear Finn) who conquered Ireland.

ÉIBHIR:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Éibhear, meaning “bow warrior.”

EIGHNACHAN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Eighneachan, possibly meaning “man of force.”

EIGHNEACHAN:

Old Irish Gaelic name, possibly meaning “man of force.” This was the name of the first O’Donnell chieftain. Ignatius is an Anglicized form.

ÉIMHÍN:

Irish Gaelic unisex name composed of the elements eim “ready, swift” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little ready one” or “little swift one.”

ÉINRÍ:

Irish Gaelic form of French Henri, meaning “home-ruler.”

EMBARR:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “imagination.” In mythology, this is the name of the heroine Niamh’s magical horse that could cross the sea and land without touching the water or the ground.

ÉNNA:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Éanna, meaning “bird-like.”

EÓGHAN (pronounced yo-wen):

Ancient Irish Gaelic name, derived from the word iúr, meaning “born of yew.”

EOIN:

Irish Gaelic form of Greek Ioannes, meaning “God is gracious.”

FACHTNA:

Irish Gaelic name possibly meaning “hostile, malicious.” In Irish legend, this is the name of the father of Conchobhar.

FÁELÁN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Faolán, meaning “little wolf.”

FAOLÁN:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the word faol “wolf” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little wolf.”

FARRELL:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fearghail “descendant of Fearghal,” hence “man of valor.”

FECHÍN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Feichín, meaning “little raven.”

FEICHÍN:

Old Irish Gaelic name composed of fiach “raven, and a diminutive suffix, hence “little raven.”

FÉIDHLIM:

Short form of Irish Gaelic Féidhlimidh, possibly meaning “hospitable.”

FÉIDHLIMIDH:

Irish Gaelic name, possibly derived from the word féile, meaning “hospitable.”

FERGUS:

Irish and Scottish Anglicized form of Gaelic Fearghus, meaning “strong-man.” In Irish mythology, this was the name an Ulster hero.

FIACHNA:

Variant form of Irish Fiachra, meaning “raven.”

FIACHRA:

Irish name derived from Gaelic fiach, meaning “raven.” In mythology, this is the name of one of the children Lir turned into swans for 900 years.

FINDLAECH:

Old Irish form of Gaelic Fionnlagh, meaning “white champion.”

FINN:

Old Irish form of modern Gaelic Fionn, meaning “fair, white.” In Irish legend, this is the name of a hero, Finn MacCool, who became all-knowing after eating a magic salmon. Compare with another form of Finn.

FINNBAR:

Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Fionnbarr, meaning “fair-headed.”

FINNEGAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Fionnagáin “descendant of Fionnagán,” hence “tiny little white one.”

FINNÉN:

Gaelic name composed of Old Irish Finn “white” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little white one.”

FINNIAN:

Irish Anglicized form of Gaelic Finnén, meaning “little white one.”

FIONN:

Modern Gaelic form of Old Irish Finn, meaning “fair, white.”

FIONNTÁN:

Variant form of Irish Gaelic Fiontan, meaning “white fire.”

FIONTAN:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements fionn “white” and tine “fire,” hence “white fire.”

FITZ:

Short form of Irish Fitzroy, meaning “illegitimate son of the king.”

FITZROY:

Irish name derived from an Anglo-Norman French surname, meaning “illegitimate son of the king.”

FLAITHRÍ:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements flaith (Gaelic flath) “chief, prince” and rí (the Old Irish form of rígh) “king,” hence “prince-king.”

FLANN:

Traditional Irish name derived from Gaelic Floin, meaning “red, ruddy.”

FLANNABHRA:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “red eyebrows.”

FLANNÁN:

Diminutive form of Irish Gaelic Flann, meaning “little red one.”

FLANNCHADH:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements Flann “red, ruddy” and cath “battle, war,” hence “red warrior.”

FLANNERY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Flannabhra “descendant of Flannabhra,” hence “red eyebrows.”

FLANNGHAL:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements Flann “red, ruddy” and gal “valor,” hence “red valor.”

FLYNN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Floinn, meaning “descendant of Flann,” hence “red, ruddy.”

FOGHLAIDH:

Irish Gaelic byname meaning “pirate, plunderer.”

FOIRTCHERN:

Irish form of English Vortigern, possibly meaning “high lord” or “overlord.” In use by the Scottish.

GALLAGER:

Variant spelling of Irish Gallagher, meaning “foreign help.”

GALLAGHER:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Gallchobhair “descendant of Gallchobhar,” hence “foreign help.”

GARBHÁN:

Irish name composed of garbh “rough” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little rough one.”

GARRETT:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Georóid, meaning “spear ruler.”

GEARÓID:

Irish Gaelic form of French Gérald, meaning “spear ruler.”

GILROY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Giolla Ruaidh, “son of the Ruadh,” hence “red.”

GIOLLADHE:

Irish name meaning “golden.”

GOBÁN:

Irish name possibly composed of the word gobha and a diminutive suffix, hence “little smith.”

GOFRAIDH:

Irish form of Old High German Gottfried, meaning “God’s peace.”

GOIBNIU:

Irish name derived from the word gobha, meaning “smith.” In mythology, this is the name of a smith god who provided weapons for the Tuatha De Danaan.

GRADY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Gráda “descendant of Gráda,” hence “noble.”

GRÉAGÓIR:

Irish Gaelic name derived from Norman French Grégoire, meaning “watchful; vigilant.”

GRÍOBHTHA:

Irish Gaelic name derived from the word gríobh, meaning “griffin.”

HANLEY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, derived from O’Hanley, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó hÁinle, meaning “descendant of Áinle,” hence “champion.”

HANRAOI:

Irish form of French Henri, meaning “home-ruler.”

HARBIN:

Rare Irish variant form of German Herbert, meaning “bright army.”

HURLEY:

Possibly a contracted form of the Irish surname Herlihy, a form of Gaelic Ó hIarfhlatha “descendant of Iarfhlaith,” hence “lord of the west.”

IARFHLAITH:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “lord of the west.”

IARLAITH:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Iarfhlaith, meaning “lord of the west.”

ÍOMHAR:

Irish Gaelic form of Old Norse Ívarr, meaning “bow warrior.”

IONATÁN:

Irish form of Hebrew Yownathan, meaning “God has given.”

KATHEL:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Cathal, meaning “battle ruler.”

KEALLACH:

Irish name meaning “battle.”

KEARNEY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Cearnaigh “descendant of Cearnaigh,” hence “victor, winner.”

KEEFE:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Caoimh “descendant of Caomh,” hence “beloved, comely.”

KEEGAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin “son of Aodhagán,” hence “tiny little fire.”

KEELAN:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from a contracted form of the surname Keelahan, an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Céileacháin, “descendant of Ceileachain,” hence “little companion.”

KENNEDY:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use in honor of the assassinated American president John F. Kennedy, derived from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Cinnéidigh, meaning “ugly head.”

KENYON:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Coinín “son of Coinín,” hence “little wolf.”

LABHRÁS:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Laurentius, meaning “of Laurentum.”

LACHTNA:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “milk-colored.”

LANTY:

Pet form of Irish Leachlainn, meaning “devotee of Saint Seachnall.”

LAOGHAIRE:

Irish name meaning “shepherd.”

LEACHLAINN:

Short form of Irish Gaelic Maeleachlainn, meaning “devotee of Saint Seachnall.”

LIAM:

Short form of Irish Uilliam, meaning “will-helmet.” Compare with another form of Liam.

LIR:

Irish name meaning “the sea.” In mythology, this is the name of a god of the sea. He is identified with Welsh Llŷr.

LOMÁN:

Irish Gaelic byname, composed of the word lomm “bare” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little bare one.”

LOMMÁN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Lomán, meaning “little bare one.”

LONÁN:

Irish name composed of the Gaelic word lon “blackbird” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little blackbird.”

LORCÁN:

Variant spelling of Irish Lorccán, meaning “little fierce one.”

LORCCÁN:

Irish name composed of the Gaelic word lorcc “fierce” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little fierce one.”

LUAN:

Old Irish Gaelic byname meaning “warrior.” Compare with another form of Luan.

LÚCÁS:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Lucas, meaning “from Lucania.”

LUGAID:

Irish name derived from the name of the Celtic god Lug, meaning “oath.” Many historical and legendary figures have borne this name.

LUGH:

Irish variant spelling of Celtic Lug, meaning “oath.” In mythology, this is the name of a heroic high king of the ancient past.

LUGHAIDH:

Variant spelling of Irish Lugaid, meaning “oath.”

MAC DARA:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “son of oak.” This is the name of a patron saint and is still common in Ireland, especially in Connemara.

MAEDÓC:

Old Irish name meaning “my dear Áedh.”

MAELEACHLAINN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Maolseachlainn, meaning “devotee of Seachlainn.”

MAEL-MAEDÓC:

Old Irish Gaelic name meaning “devotee of Maedóc.”

MAGNUS:

Scandinavian name derived from the latter part of French Charlemagne (“Charles the Great”), from Latin magnus, meaning “great.” Used infrequently by the Irish and Scottish. Compare with another form of Magnus.

MAINCHÍN:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the word manach “monk” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little monk.”

MÁIRTÍN:

Irish Gaelic form of English/French Martin, meaning “of/like Mars.”

MALONE:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Maoil Eoin, meaning “devotee of St. Eoin (John).”

MANUS:

Irish form of Roman Latin Magnus, meaning “great.”

MAODHÓG:

Modern form of Old Irish Gaelic Maedóc, “my dear Áedh.”

MAOILEACHLAINN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Maeleachlainn, meaning “devotee of Seachlainn.”

MAOILMHÍN:

Old Irish Gaelic name meaning “gentle chieftain.”

MAOLGFHOGHMHAIR:

Old Irish Gaelic name meaning “chief of harvest.”

MAOLSEACHLAINN:

Irish name composed of the Gaelic word mael “devotee” and the personal name Seachlainn, hence “devotee of Seachlainn.”

MARCAS:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Marcus, meaning “defense” or “of the sea.”

MÁRTAN:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Martinus, meaning “of/like Mars.”

MATHGHAMHAIN:

Irish Gaelic byname meaning “bear calf.”

MATHÚIN:

Modern Irish spelling of the Old Gaelic byname Mathghamhain, meaning “bear calf.”

MEALLÁN:

Irish Gaelic name which was probably originally a byname for a short stocky person, composed of the elements meall “knot, lump” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little lump.”

MELLAN:

Variant spelling of Irish Meallán, meaning “little lump.”

MÍCHEÁL:

Irish Gaelic form of Greek Michaēl, meaning “who is like God?”

MIDIR:

Irish name of unknown meaning. In Celtic mythology, this is the name of a lord of the underworld, the husband of Fuamnach.

MIL:

Irish legend name (Mil Espane “Mil of Spain”) of the father of Éibhear Dunn and Éibhear Finn, who conquered Ireland. Possibly derived from the Latin word miles, meaning “soldier.”

MILE:

Variant spelling of Irish Mil, possibly meaning “soldier.” Compare with another form of Mile.

MOLAN:

Irish name meaning “servant of the storm.”

MUIRIS:

Irish form of Roman Latin Maurice, meaning “dark-skinned; Moor.”

MUNRO:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, derived from Monadh Roe or Mont Roe, meaning “from the mount on the river Roe.” This is the name from which Scottish Monroe was derived.

MUNROE:

Variant spelling of Irish Munro, meaning “from the mount on the river Roe.”

MURPHY:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Murchadha “descendant of Murchadh,” hence “sea-warrior.”

MURTAGH:

Irish form of Scottish Gaelic Muireadhach, meaning “sea warrior.” Compare with another form of Murtagh.

NAOIS:

Short form of Irish Gaelic Naoise, of unknown meaning.

NAOISE:

Irish Gaelic name, of unknown meaning. In Celtic mythology, this is the name of the warrior nephew of King Conchobar and beloved of Deirdre.

NAOMHÁN:

Irish name composed of the element naomh “holy, saint” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little saint.”

NÉILL:

Variant form of Irish Gaelic Niall, meaning “champion.”

NEVIN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of either Gaelic Cnámhín, a nickname for a skinny man meaning “little bone,” or from Gaelic Naomhán, meaning “little saint.”

NIALL:

Old Gaelic name derived from Old Irish Niul, meaning “champion.”

NIOCLÁS:

Irish form of Latin Nicolaus, meaning “victor of the people.”

NIUL:

Old Irish name thought to probably be derived from the word niadh, meaning “champion.”

NOISIU:

Variant form of Irish Gaelic Naoise, of unknown meaning. In mythology, this is the name of the warrior nephew of King Conchobar and beloved of Deirdre.

NOLAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Ó Nualláin “descendant of Nuallán,” hence “little champion” or “little chariot fighter.”

NUADA:

Irish name, possibly derived from Proto-Indo-European *sneudh, meaning “fog.” In mythology, this is the name of a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann, best remembered by the name Airgetlám (“silver arm/hand”), an epithet bestowed on him after his hand or arm was cut off by a Fir Bolg warrior in the first Battle of Magh Tuiredh.

NUADHA:

Variant spelling of Irish Nuada, possibly meaning “fog.”

ODHRÁN:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the word odhar “dun; pale green; sallow” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little sallow one.”

OILILL:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Ailill, meaning “elf.”

OILIOLL:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Ailill, meaning “elf.”

OISÍN:

Irish name composed of the word os “deer” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little deer.” In mythology, this is the name of a son of Fionn mac Cumhail.

ORMOND:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Ruaidh, meaning “descendant of Ruadh.”

OSCAR:

Irish Gaelic form of Scottish Gaelic Osgar, meaning “deer-lover.” Compare with another form of Oscar.

PÁDRAIG:

Modern form of Old Irish Gaelic Patraicc, meaning “patrician; of noble descent.”

PAIDÍ:

Pet form of Irish Gaelic Pádraig, meaning “patrician; of noble birth.”

PÁIDÍN:

Diminutive form of Irish Gaelic P�draig, meaning “little patrician” or “little noble.”

PARTH:

Short form of Irish Gaelic Parthalán, possibly meaning “son of Talmai.”

PARTHALÁN:

Irish Gaelic legend name, thought by some to have been derived from Latin Bartholomaeus, meaning “son of Talmai.” As the legend goes, this name belonged to an early invader of Ireland who was the first to arrive on those shores after the biblical flood.

PATRAICC:

Old Irish Gaelic name derived from Latin Patricius, meaning “patrician; of noble descent.”

PIARAS:

Irish Gaelic form of Greek Petros, meaning “rock, stone.”

PILIB:

Irish Gaelic form of Greek Philippos, meaning “lover of horses.”

PÓL:

Irish form of Greek Paulos, meaning “small.”

PROINSIAS:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Franciscus, meaning “French.”

PROINNTEACH:

Irish name composed of the Gaelic elements proinn “banquet” and teach “hall, house,” denoting a “generous person.”

QUINLAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Caoindealbhán “descendant of Caoindealbhán,” hence “little fair-formed one.”

QUINN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Coinn “descendant of Conn,” hence “chief, freeman, head, hound, intelligence, strength.”

RAGHNALL:

Irish Gaelic form of Old Norse Rögnvaldr, meaning “wise ruler.”

REAGAN:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, derived from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Riagáin, “descendant of Riagán,” hence “furious, impulsive.”

RÉAMANN:

Irish Gaelic form of English Raymond, meaning “wise protector.”

RÍOGHBHARDÁN:

Old Irish name composed of the Gaelic elements ríogh “king,” bard “poet,” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little poet-king.”

RÍOGHNÁN:

Irish name composed of the element ríogh “king” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little king.”

RISTÉARD:

Irish Gaelic form of Old High German Ricohard, meaning “powerful ruler.”

ROBAN:

Pet form of Irish Gaelic Roibéard, meaning “bright fame.”

ROIBÉARD:

Irish Gaelic form of Norman French Robert, meaning “bright fame.”

RÓNÁN:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the word rón “oath, seal” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little oath, little seal.”

RÓRDÁN:

A derivative of Irish Gaelic Ríoghbhardán, meaning “little poet-king.”

ROWAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, derived from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ruadhán, meaning “little red one.” Compare with feminine Rowan.

ROY:

Pet form of Irish Gaelic Roibéard, meaning “bright fame.” Compare with other forms of Roy.

RUADH:

Old Irish byname derived from Gaelic ruadh, meaning “red.”

RUADHÁN:

Diminutive form of Irish Gaelic Ruadh (“red”), hence “little red.”

RUAIDHRÍ:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the Celtic elements ruadh “red” and rí from ríogh “king,” hence “red king.”

RUAIDRÍ:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Ruaidhrí, meaning “red king.”

RUAIRÍ:

Variant spelling of Irish Ruaidhrí, meaning “red king.”

RYAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Riain (“descendant of Rian”), hence “little king.”

SCANLAN:

Irish name meaning “scandal.”

SCANLON:

Variant spelling of Irish Scanlan, meaning “scandal.”

SCULLY:

Irish name meaning “herald.”

SÉ:

Short form of Irish Gaelic Séaghdha, possibly meaning “hawk-like.”

SEACHLAINN:

Irish Gaelic form of Roman Latin Secundinus, meaning “second.”

SEACHNALL:

Older form of Irish Gaelic Seachlainn, meaning “second.”

SÉAFRA:

Irish Gaelic form of English Geoffrey, probably meaning “God’s peace.”

SÉAGHDHA:

Traditional Irish name derived from the Gaelic byname Seaghdh, possibly meaning “hawk-like.”

SÉAMAS:

Modern form of Irish Gaelic Séamus, meaning “supplanter.”

SÉAMUS:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Jacomus, meaning “supplanter.”

SEÁN:

Irish Gaelic form of French Jean (English John), meaning “God is gracious.”

SEANÁN:

Irish name composed of the Gaelic word sean “old, wise” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little wise one.”

SÉARLAS:

Irish Gaelic form of English/French Charles, meaning “man.”

SECHNALL:

Irish form of Roman Latin Secundinus, meaning “second.”

SENAN:

Variant spelling of Irish Seanán, meaning “little wise one.”

SEOIRSE:

Irish form of Greek Georgios, meaning “earth-worker, farmer.”

SEOSAMH:

Irish Gaelic form of Greek Ioseph, meaning “(God) shall add (another son).”

SHEA:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Séaghdha (“descendant of Séaghdha”), possibly meaning “hawk-like.”

SHERIDAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Sirideáin (“descendant of Siride�n”), possibly meaning “searcher.”

SÍOMÓN:

Irish Gaelic form of Greek Symeon, meaning “hearkening.”

SIOTHRÚN:

Irish Gaelic form of French Geoffroi or Godefrei, meaning “God’s peace.”

SIRIDEÁN:

Irish Gaelic name, possibly derived from the word sirim (“to seak”), hence “searcher.”

SLOANE:

Irish surname transferred to unisex forename use, derived from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Sluaghadháin, “descendant of Sluaghadhán,” hence “little raider.”

SLUAGHADH:

Irish name derived from Gaelic sluaghadh (“expedition, raid”), hence “raider.”

SLUAGHADHÁN:

Diminutive form of Irish Sluaghadh (“raider”), hence “little raider.”

SOMHAIRLE:

Irish Gaelic form of Old Norse Sumarlíðr, meaning “summer traveler.”

SORLEY:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Somhairle, meaning “summer traveler.”

STIANA:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Stephanus, meaning “crown.”

STIOFÁN:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Stephanus, meaning “crown.”

SUIBHNE:

Irish and Scottish Gaelic name meaning “well-going.”

SUIBNE:

Irish variant form of Gaelic Suibhne, meaning “well-going.”

SÚILEABHÁN:

Old Irish Gaelic name composed of the elements súil “eye” and dubh “black, dark,” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little dark eyes.”

SULLIVAN:

Irish surname transferred to forename use, from an Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Súileabháin (“descendant of Súileabhán”), hence “little dark eyes.”

TADG:

Variant spelling of Irish/Scottish Gaelic Tadhg, meaning “poet.”

TADHG:

Irish and Scottish Gaelic name meaning “poet.”

TIGERNACH:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Tighearnach, meaning “lord.”

TIGERNÁN:

Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Tighearnán, meaning “little lord.”

TIGERNMAGLUS:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “lordly prince.”

TIGHEARNACH:

Irish Gaelic name derived from the word tighearn, meaning “lord.”

TIGHEARNÁN:

Irish Gaelic name composed of the word tighearn “lord” and a diminutive suffix, hence “little lord.”

TOIRDHEALBHACH:

Irish Gaelic name derived from the word toirdhealbh “prompting,” hence “instigator.”

TOMÁS:

Irish Gaelic form of Greek Thōmas, meaning “twin.” Compare with another form of Tomás.

TORIN:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “chief.”

TORMOD:

Danish and Norwegian form of Old Norse Þormóðr, meaning “Thor’s mind.” In use by the Irish.

TUATHAL:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “ruler of the people.”

TUIREANN:

Irish name meaning “thunderer.” In Celtic mythology, this is the name of the husband of Bríghid.

UAITHNE:

Irish name meaning “green.”

UALTAR:

Irish form of French Waltier, meaning “ruler of the army.”

UILLEAG:

Pet form of Irish Gaelic Uilliam, meaning “will-helmet.”

UILLIAM:

Irish Gaelic form of German Wilhelm, meaning “will-helmet.”

UINSEANN:

Irish Gaelic form of Latin Vincens, meaning “conquering.”

ULTÁN:

Irish Gaelic name meaning “of Ulster.”

WILEY:

Variant spelling of Irish/Scottish Wylie, meaning “will-helmet.” Compare with another form of Wiley.

WYLIE:

Irish and Scottish equivalent of English Willy, meaning “will-helmet.”

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